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News | Creative Communities Page Turner: Dalkey Book Festival

Creative Ireland takes to the road with a special series of talks, debates and discussions at this year’s Dalkey Book Festival.

Dublin’s southside seaside town Dalkey is anything but sleepy. Throughout the year, the suburb is magnet for people seeking some of the most scenic walks in the county.

And then for a few days in June, the streets get even busier when the Dalkey Book Festival takes hold of the village. The inaugural event kicked off in 2010, but Dalkey’s literary heritage stretches back much further.

Nobel laureate George Bernard Shaw grew up in the town in the mid 19th century, while James Joyce, Samuel Beckett and Flann O’Brien were frequent visitors with close connections to the area. The salt-aired suburb continues to be a draw for creative minds, with Joseph O’Connor, Jim Sheridan and Neil Jordan all calling it home.

The close-knit setting means that literary greats rub shoulders with locals and attendees throughout the festival.

The intimate festival uses the entire town as its venue, with events taking place everywhere from shops to the Medieval graveyard to schools to its very own Masonic Lodge. The close-knit setting means that literary greats rub shoulders with locals and attendees throughout the festival.

This year’s festival – which takes place from 15-18 June - kicks off a special series of Creative Ireland debates, discussions and conversations at a host of events across the country this year. The three-day programme is packed with unmissable events and a wide range of guests, including award-winning director Lenny Abrahamson, North Korean defector Hyeonseo Lee, Man Booker Prize winner Marlon James and side-splittingly funny David O’Doherty.

Culture vultures have a lot more to look out for as the year continues, with the Creative Ireland Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown plan for 2017. This is just the first phase of the area’s five-year plan to nurture culture and creativity throughout the area.

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